The Other McCain

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Feminism 2017: @Rose_Resistance — Communist Lesbians Against America

Posted on | October 1, 2017 | 2 Comments

 

 

Erika Heidewald is a German-born lesbian feminist and Democrat Party activist who hates capitalism, Christianity and white males, not necessarily in that order. Before last year’s election, Ms. Heidewald was busy with her immigrant girlfriend Frida on YouTube promoting homosexuality and also, of course, campaigning for Hillary Clinton.

 

 

 

Like other Democrats who have rejected democracy, Ms. Heidewald was inspired by Mrs. Clinton’s defeat to declare Donald Trump “Not My President,” and create a YouTube program “Resistance News Network.”

 

 

 

Ms. Heidewald denounces Republicans as “fascists” and, after the 2016 election, she created an organization called The Rose Resistance “to fight fascism and white supremacy” and “help protect the people most endangered by the Trump regime.” Ms. Heidewald claims to stand for “democracy” when, in fact, she advocates a one-party dictatorship by her rhetoric that delegitimizes Republicans. She seems to believe, and seeks to persuade others, that the 63 million Americans who voted to elect Donald Trump should have no right to be represented in government.

 

 

This rhetoric of “progressive” intolerance (reflecting the influence of Herbert Marcuse and the Frankfurt School) is the antithesis of democracy. It is therefore not surprising to see Ms. Eichenwald with an anti-Trump poster from the Revolutionary Communist Party (RCP).

 

Those readers who recall my coverage of the 2016 Republican National Convention will remember that the anti-police protesters in Cleveland waved RCP posters that declared “America Was Never Great.”

 

“There will be no peace unless there is justice,” Professor Cornell West said Tuesday in a speech to an anti-police rally here organized by the Revolutionary Communist Party (RCP). Speaking through a megaphone amid a crowd of protesters gathered at Public Square in downtown Cleveland, West invoked “the legacy of white supremacy in this country that goes back 400 years” to condemn police.
West spoke in front of a giant RCP banner declaring, “Time to Get Organized for an ACTUAL Revolution. STOP MURDER BY POLICE.” Activists with the RCP held aloft signs that read, “America Was NEVER Great! We Need to OVERTHROW This System!”

The RCP, which advocates the “overthrow” of the American “system,” is a Maoist cult founded by Bob Avakian. The RCP became notorious in the 1980s when it called for the assassination of Ronald Reagan. The RCP and its front group Refuse Fascism have recently made headlines by announcing nationwide protests to “end the Trump/Pence Regime”:

Antifa is planning a new round of nationwide riots on November 4 as part of a plot to start a “civil war” that will lead to the overthrow of the Trump administration.
Far-left militants plan to “gather in the streets and public squares of cities and towns across this country” in the hope of building momentum for civil unrest that leads to nothing less than domestic regime change.
“Our protest must grow day after day and night after night—thousands becoming hundreds of thousands, and then millions—determined to act to put a stop to the grave danger that the Trump/Pence Regime poses to the world by demanding that this whole regime be removed from power,” states a call to action on the RefuseFascism website.
A longer screed posted on the Revolutionary Communist website makes it clear that Antifa is not prepared to wait for electoral change from Democrats, and will engage in a “ferocious struggle,” based on plans outlined in a book written by Bob Avakian, the Chairman of the Revolutionary Communist Party, which is called The Coming Civil War.

 

This extremist rhetoric — denying the legitimacy of a constitutionally elected government by denouncing it as a “regime” of fascism, white supremacy, etc. — is not merely divisive, it is dangerous, especially when accompanied by militant talk of “struggle” and “revolution.”

The RCP’s advocacy of “civil war” is not idle chatter. We have seen in the past three years how the Democrat-supported racial terrorist movement Black Lives Matter incited violent riots in Ferguson, Baltimore, and Charlotte, and sparked assassinations of police officers. Not surprisingly, Erika Heidewald is a big fan of Black Lives Matter.

 

This endorsement of Black Lives Matter, like her embrace of the RCP, puts Erika Heidewald on the extreme fringe of American politics. However, this L.A.-based lesbian feminist actually represents the mainstream of young Democrats who have internalized the identity-politics ideology of their party in the post-Obama era. The irrationality of her rhetoric — including her claim that the only alternative to identity politics is “white male supremacy” — reflects the crisis of a party that is intellectually bankrupt and at a historic low ebb of influence.

Democrats have lost power at every level, as Republicans not only control the White House and both houses of Congress, but also hold the governorships of 33 states, and 68 of 99 state legislative chambers. In 32 states, which are home to 61% of the U.S. population, the GOP controls both houses of the state legislature. Hillary Clinton’s supporters like to point out she won the popular vote, with 66 million votes to Trump’s 63 million, yet nearly a quarter of her total — more than 16 million votes — were concentrated in just three states: California, New York and Illinois. Lacking effective leadership, Democrats have become deranged and desperate, and are being attracted to lunatic fringe movements.

 

On Sept. 26, when the RCP front group Refuse Fascism blocked the 101 expressway in downtown Los Angeles, one of the protesters was Perry Hoberman, a 62-year-old professor at the University of Southern California. Hoberman’s anti-Trump tirade is worth quoting:

“This is basically how fascism works,” Hoberman says. “It’s shock and awe. It’s the big lie. It’s doing things so absurd that no one knows how to react. It’s impossible to keep track of what they’re doing and how they’re driving us all crazy.” . . .
“They’re playing with utter destruction and it’s completely unconscionable to let it go on.” . . .
“Calls to impeach and take back the House and Senate are fine, and we support all that. But ultimately we don’t think anything will fix this but mass action by huge amounts of people gumming things up.
“This is just too serious to continue with business as usual.”

“They’re driving us all crazy.”

Hillary Clinton got 71% of the vote in Los Angeles County, and yet this was absolutely irrelevant to the outcome of the election. Liberals are politically isolated in their urban enclaves, ranting about “white supremacy” and “fascism” because too many voters in places like Iowa, Wisconsin and Michigan are sick and tired of being lectured by Hollywood elitists, university professors, and CNN talking heads.

 

So here is Erika Heideman in her “Trump Is Not My President” T-shirt, living in Los Angeles with her Swedish lesbian girlfriend, apparently oblivious to how the rest of the electorate might read her message. This is relevant to a point I made after Roy Moore’s victory Tuesday:

In the GOP primaries, Ted Cruz was the main candidate of the Christian Right, who did not approve of Trump’s offensive language and behavior. Nevertheless, when it came to a choice between Trump and Hillary Clinton, conservative Christians knew which side they were on. If they didn’t, Hillary’s campaign reminded them.

The Cultural Left was empowered by Obama’s presidency, to the detriment of the Democrat Party’s appeal to mainstream Americans. As the Democrats have become more beholden to the far-left fringe, they have alienated the kind of middle-class voters who might not be “right wing,” but who damned sure aren’t going to vote for a Democrat Party that looks increasingly like the cast of the Rocky Horror Picture Show.

 

Erika Heidewald probably doesn’t realize that gay Republicans played a key role in launching Donald Trump as a presidential candidate. The group GOProud invited Donald Trump to speak at CPAC in 2011, and my late friend Andrew Breitbart threw a party for them:

Also exciting to many attendees was the prospect of Thursday night’s GOProud party at 18th Street Lounge with Big Government publisher Andrew Breitbart, featuring ’90s alt rock performer Sophie B. Hawkins. More than 500 guests are expected at the event, according to organizers.
Breitbart, a Los Angeles conservative, reached out to GOProud about throwing the party for them as a way of welcoming gays and lesbians to the conservative conference.
“This party will highlight the story the main stream media has missed in the weeks leading up to CPAC, namely that the vast majority of the conservative movement is united and welcomes GOProud and any other conservative into the fold,” said Breitbart, who also recently joined GOProud’s Advisory Council, announcing the event in early February.

Yeah, I was at that party. Despite my status as a member of the heteropatriarchy, effective coalition politics in a two-party system requires a broad-based movement to win a majority in a diverse nation of 330 million people. To quote former GOP chairman Haley Barbour, “My old boss Ronald Reagan used to say, ‘Somebody who agrees with me 80 percent of the time is a friend and ally, not a 20 percent traitor.’”

Of course, in the 2012 GOP primaries, I ended up supporting Rick Santorum, the antithesis of GOProud, who was unfortunately defeated by the establishment candidate, Mitt Romney. Now, I hate establishment Republicans and consider Mormonism a cult, but that didn’t stop me from going all-in once Mormon Mitt locked up the GOP nomination.

Erika Heidewald is a young Democrat and a fool, but I repeat myself. Perhaps some day she will grow up, get tired of hanging around with losers, and decide instead to help Make America Great Again.



 

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