The Other McCain

"One should either write ruthlessly what one believes to be the truth, or else shut up." — Arthur Koestler

ConFFFFFirmed!

Posted on | October 7, 2018 | 5 Comments

Brett Kavanaugh is sworn in by Chief Justice Roberts.

Saturday was my birthday and I got some great gifts: Auburn lost to Mississippi State, and Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh was sworn in after the Senate voted 50-48 to confirm his nomination:

Judge Brett Kavanaugh was sworn in as the 114th Supreme Court justice late Saturday, just hours after the Senate voted to approve President Trump’s nominee to the nation’s highest court after a rancorous confirmation battle.
Kavanaugh was sworn in by Chief Justice John Roberts in a private ceremony, accompanied by his wife and children. The ceremonial swearing in is expected to happen on Monday evening at the White House. It means that now-Justice Kavanaugh will begin hearing cases before the court on Tuesday.
The Senate voted 50-48 to confirm Kavanaugh, mostly along party lines, after a weeklong FBI probe helped settle concerns among most wavering senators about the sexual assault allegations that nearly derailed his nomination and led to a dramatic second hearing. Saturday’s roll call marked the tightest successful Supreme Court confirmation vote in over 100 years, closer than even that of Clarence Thomas who similarly faced sexual misconduct allegations.
Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., was the sole Democrat to vote “yes.” Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, was a “no,” but voted “present” as a courtesy to Sen. Steve Daines, R-Mont., who was attending his daughter’s wedding in Montana.
Democrats reacted to the vote by urging supporters to turn out to the polls in November for the midterms.
“The American people are raising their voices to a deafening roar today. We will not stop marching, we will not stop fighting, and we will vote on Election Day for leaders who share our values,” Democratic National Committee Chair Tom Perez said in a statement. . . .
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., brushed off criticism from Democrats and said it was “a good day for America and an important day for the Senate.”
“We stood up for the presumption of innocence, we refused to be intimidated by the mob of people coming after Republican members at their homes and hallways,” he said.
At a rally in Topeka, Kansas, President Trump hailed the confirmation as a “tremendous victory” and slammed Democrats for their treatment of Kavanaugh during the contentious confirmation hearing.
“What he and his family endured at the hands of Democrats is unthinkable. In their quest for power, the radical Democrats have turned into an angry mob, you saw that today with the screaming and shouting,” he said, referring to protests outside the Senate and Supreme Court earlier in the day.

Did I mention Auburn lost? That Mississippi State quarterback was something else — 6-foot-5, 230 pounds, Nick Fitzgerald ran for nearly 200 yards, and really made Auburn look bad, but I guess I should get back to recapping the Supreme Court nomination.

Here’s some whining from a Vox-dot-com writer:

Forty-nine Senate Republicans and one Democrat just confirmed Brett Kavanaugh to the United State Supreme Court. No allegations, no protesters, no public opinion poll showing Brett Kavanaugh is the most unpopular person to be elevated to the nation’s highest court in recent history was going to stop them. . . .
The Senate has answered definitively: We do not believe her, not really, and we don’t care that the public does.
This is the governing ideology of the Republican Party: We don’t care what anybody else thinks. We have the power. We have the will. We have the votes. We’ll do what we want.
In politics, there’s winning the argument, and there’s winning the vote. Republicans lost the argument, but they ultimately had the votes.

Guess what? Republicans are almost certainly going to have more Senate votes after Nov. 6. Heidi Heitkamp is toast in North Dakota, Joe Donnelly in Indiana has given Republican voters more reason to hate him, as has Claire McCaskill in Missouri, the two most recent polls show Florida a dead heat, Montana is within the margin of error, and even Bob Menendez could lose in New Jersey. At this point, a 55- or 56-seat Senate majority seems the most likely outcome of the midterm elections, and there’s almost no chance that Chuck Schumer will be holding the gavel anytime soon. Republican voters have been united and energized by the Kavanaugh fight, which exposed the desperate lengths to which Democrats were willing to go to obtain power. Heck, at one point, they even resorted to witchcraft in their desperation.

 

Democrats have already identified the scapegoat for their failure:

Attorney Michael Avenatti stymied Democrats’ attempts to derail confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, Democratic senators and aides told CNN.
“Democrats and the country would have been better off if Mr. Avenatti spent his time on his Iowa vanity project rather than meddling in Supreme Court fights,” a top Democratic Senate aide told CNN ahead of Saturday’s vote to confirm Kavanaugh.
“His involvement set us back, absolutely,” said the aide, referring to Avenatti’s fledgling 2020 presidential campaign.
Avenatti, who represents porn star Stormy Daniels, entered the Kavanaugh foray as an attorney for Julie Swetnick, a Washington, D.C. woman who claimed that Kavanaugh was present at house parties in the early 1980s were girls were gang raped.
Avenatti pushed Swetnick’s case at his cable TV mainstays, CNN and MSNBC, but ultimately failed to produce the witnesses he claimed would come forward to support his client’s case. . . .
While Kavanaugh appeared on the ropes after Ford’s story emerged, conservatives rallied around him in response to the Swetnick allegations.
Asked about Avenatti’s involvement in the Kavanaugh case, Sen. Gary Peters, a Michigan Democrat, suggested that the attorney distracted from Democrats’ mission to derail Kavanaugh’s confirmation.
“Well you know at some point there were a lot of folks coming forward making all sorts of accusations,” Peters told CNN. “It turns it into a circus atmosphere and certainly that’s not where we should be.”

 

Democrats and their media allies have no one but themselves to blame for Avenatti’s opportunistic showboating. Bad causes attract bad people, and the smear campaign against Kavanaugh was a perfect example of this principle. “Boy, ya’ll want power,” as Lindsey Graham told Democrats during the confirmation. “I hope to God you never get it.”

“The left has given up trying to persuade people of their point of view,” Mike LaChance of Legal Insurrection said on Twitter. “All they offer is rage and hostility to those who don’t agree with them.”

 

Donald Trump’s instincts were again proven correct:

The president commented on the narrow Senate confirmation vote to confirm Kavanaugh during his trip aboard Air Force One to Kansas. A handful of leftist women protesters were dragged out of the Senate chamber during the vote, shrieking as Senators moved forward with the confirmation.
“When you hear those screamers in Congress today, the screaming, you see how orchestrated it is, how phony it is,” Trump said, referring to the protesters. “They practice it together and they do it with the Democrats.”
White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders confirmed that Trump called Kavanaugh at the end of the Senate vote. He was sworn into office later Saturday evening.
Trump asserted that many women were concerned with the Kavanaugh proceedings were worried about men in their lives.
“[T]hey’re thinking of their sons, they’re thinking of their husbands and their brothers, their uncles, and others,” Trump said. “And women are I think extremely happy.”
Trump said that many women were in some ways more upset than men by the uncorroborated accusations by Christine Ford.
“Women were outraged at what happened to Brett Kavanaugh, outraged, and I think that’s a total misnomer because the women, I feel, were in many ways stronger than the men in his favor,” Trump said.
When reporters asked if he believed that Ford misidentified an attack from Kavanaugh over 30 years ago, Trump replied, “100 percent.”

Christian Adams describes the deranged mob scene at the Capitol:

I was in the Senate gallery this afternoon when Justice Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed. You would have thought I was at an exorcism in an insane asylum.
Perhaps you were watching on television and heard the disruptions, though you certainly didn’t see them. The attenuated audio probably didn’t catch the frightening, incoherent shrieking – including the lingering screaming and howling as they were being dragged down the hallways outside the gallery.
If there was any doubt that the opposition to Kavanaugh was unhinged, uncivil, disruptive, rude, and borderline nuts, my experience in the gallery made it clear. . . .
“Mob rule is necessary,” one shrieking woman shouted before security personnel could settle her down.
At least she was honest. It did not appear that Capitol Police removed her for her crime, unfortunately. That would soon change.
Another crazed woman later screamed, “I will not consent, I will not consent, I will not consent, I will not consent.” She was like a feminist automaton: “I will not consent, I will not consent.” Capitol Police were less forgiving and dragged her out the doors and down the hallway.
I have visited hospitals for the seriously mentally ill, and the shrieks from this woman were as odd and unearthly as anything I ever heard inside a mental hospital.

Once the party of the working man, Democrats have become the party of the screaming woman. Trump has literally driven them insane.

(Hat-tip: Sarah Hoyt at Instapundit.)

It’s hard to think of a better way to celebrate my birthday than to watch demented Democrats shrieking in helpless rage as a Senate Republican majority rams a conservative Supreme Court justice down their throats, except the Five Most Important Words in the English Language:

HIT THE FREAKING TIP JAR!



 

UPDATE: Welcome, Instapundit readers!

 

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