The Other McCain

"One should either write ruthlessly what one believes to be the truth, or else shut up." — Arthur Koestler

‘Team Kimberlin’ Meltdown Continues

Posted on | June 12, 2012 | 104 Comments

FROM AN UNDISCLOSED LOCATION
Liars hate nothing worse than to be exposed as liars — exposure makes it hard for them to get away with their lies — and three weeks of public attention to lying felon Brett Kimberlin and his associates have put them under extraordinary psychological pressure.

We’ve seen evidence of Neal Rauhauser’s spiraling descent into madness, outlined by Dan Collins at The Conservatory:

In the email, Rauhauser concedes that the SWATting of Stack was likely performed by one of his “beandog” followers, but that he believes the culprit will get off because the call was untraceable. In Rauhauser’s demented mind, Patterico, Stacy and others were actually the cause of the SWATting, according to some as-yet-to-be-invoked legal theory. . . .
Sometime Kimberlin operative Ron Brynaert has been trying to play a double game, quarrelling with Rauhauser on the one hand and threatening Kimberlin critics who associate him with Rauhauser and Kimberlin on the other, and is likelier than Rauhauser to flip, IMO, but this revelation changes the playing field quite a bit. I wouldn’t be surprised to find Rauhauser turning state’s evidence against Kimberlin at the sane advice of legal counsel. Whether he still has the functioning neurons to try to pull his ass out of the fire, though, is an open question.

There is now a Memeorandum thread, and more and more people are beginning to see the connections between the various dots in the bizarre pattern surrounding Kimberlin’s tax-exempt 501(c) operations at Velvet Revolution and Justice Through Music Project. Investigative journalist Matthew Vadum assures me that lying is not considered a charitable activity by the IRS, and one wonders what the authorities would discover in a thorough forensic audit of Kimberlin’s lucrative (although “non-profit”) enterprises.

Kimberlin and his associates constantly claim to be victims of harassment, but who’s really harassing whom? Patterico exposes the vicious harassment of Mandy “Liberty Chick” Nagy by one of Kimberlin’s most vocal and persistent online defenders.

Furthermore — and there are so many dots in this pattern that new connections are sometimes surprising — Patterico demonstrates what would appear to be conspiratorial collusion between Rauhauser and Nadia Naffe, who has claimed that she was harassed by James O’Keefe. This is a connection involving Jay Leiderman, a California attorney with ties to both the Occupy movement and the “Anonymous” international hacker conspiracy.

One of Leiderman’s clients was the criminal hacker known as “Commander X,” who jumped bail and joined the Occupy movement. Leiderman had defended the denial-of-service attacks by ”Commander X” as a form of civil disobedience. But now Leiderman’s  another attorney, Ed Fry, is on the hook for the $35,000 bond he signed for this Rosa Parks of hacking.

Cosmic justice is a funny thing that way.

-– Robert Stacy McCain, Whereabouts Unknown

 

 

 

THE KIMBERLIN FILES

UPDATE: Dan Collins has updated to correct a misunderstanding:

Correction: Mike Stack emails to state that he pressed charges against Rauhauser for harassment, but that neither is suing the other.

I’ve also corrected an error. I had previously misread the Talking Points Memo article about Christopher “Commander X” Doyon, which makes clear that it wasn’t Jay Leiderman who signed the bond for Doyon:

Ed Fry, a lawyer who has been involved in the the Occupy movement in Santa Cruz, told TPM he met Doyon during the summer of 2010 and put up the bond to help out a friend. He doesn’t think the law will catch up to Doyon, who joined up with the Occupy movement after being released.
“I don’t expect him to be caught. He’s pretty Wile E. Coyote,” said Fry, adding that he last talked to Doyon around Christmas. He said signing the bond was a risk he had to take.

Our first obligation is to get the facts right, and even minor factual errors — honest mistakes — are regrettable.

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