The Other McCain

"One should either write ruthlessly what one believes to be the truth, or else shut up." — Arthur Koestler

Hillary Is Madonna or Something

Posted on | December 12, 2016 | 2 Comments

Everybody wants to play pundit nowadays. The New York Times unleashed its arts writers on the most over-analyzed election in history:

“I was called a whore and a witch,” Madonna said on Friday in a searing speech about the sexism and bullying that women face in the music industry and the culture at large.
“Such a nasty woman,” Donald J. Trump interjected in October as Hillary Clinton pointed out holes in his Social Security plan during their final presidential debate.
Madonna and Mrs. Clinton: both trailblazers, both polarizing figures, and both attacked for actions, choices and behavior that are broadly accepted — even applauded — when done by their male peers. Madonna herself made a connection between the two women before her speech Friday, saying it was “really important to make a stand and speak my mind” about women’s rights after Mrs. Clinton’s loss in November.
Our pop music editor, Caryn Ganz, and deputy Culture editor and former political correspondent Patrick Healy looked at how Madonna and her speech put Mrs. Clinton’s candidacy in fresh perspective. . . .

Go read the whole thing and ask yourself: Why?

Why does every liberal with access to a computer feel the need to share their “perspective” on this topic? Why do we care what Madonna says?

Isn’t the purpose of this kind of “journalism” essentially therapeutic?

Aren’t these New York Times writers basically grieving in public, and inviting their fellow liberals to console themselves about Hillary’s loss by saying, “All great women suffer the slings and arrows of misogyny”? By putting the whole election into “perspective” — a perspective where even millionaire pop stars and powerful politicians can think of themselves as victims of patriarchal oppression — the New York Times invites their affluent liberal readers to share in the sense of communal victimhood. Is the entire staff of the New York Times gobbling Prozac and Paxil? Are there any emotionally stable journalists employed there, or is the entire staff just one big group therapy session for depressed neurotics?

 

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