The Other McCain

"One should either write ruthlessly what one believes to be the truth, or else shut up." — Arthur Koestler

Anti-Semitism Ruins Everything

Posted on | December 29, 2016 | 1 Comment

One of the weird effects of the recent election is how the Left has tried to taint Donald Trump’s supporters as anti-Semites when, during the presidency of George W. Bush, the Left deliberately exploited anti-Semitism by portraying Republicans as beholden to “neoconservatives” (nudge, nudge) and “international bankers” (wink, wink).

Because most accusations of “anti-Semitism” are made in the context of partisan politics and are therefore as bogus as most accusations of racism, sexism and homophobia in such a context, I have a high threshold for judging what is or is not worth condemning as anti-Semitic. It ill behooves conservatives to mimic the Left in hurling such accusations haphazardly, especially considering how many conservatives have been unfairly impugned on this basis. Also, I think it is important to distinguish between (a) what I call vulgar anti-Semitism and (b) conspiratorial anti-Semitism.

Vulgar anti-Semitism is simply a general dislike of Jews, a prejudice based upon certain stereotypical negative traits. America is a free country, and we cannot compel people to like other people. If you do not like rednecks or hillbillies, for example, I may object to your unfair prejudice against my own ethnic group, but that doesn’t mean you should be fired from your job or excluded from public life. There is no Appalachian-American Anti-Defamation League to keep track of anti-redneck prejudice in the media, nor is there any Hillbilly Student Alliance to protest against university faculty who express bias against NASCAR fans, bluegrass musicians or trailer-park residents. Because we cannot be forced to like any particular ethnic group, therefore, the accusation of “hate” ought not to be made except where the expression of prejudice can be shown to be dangerous and harmful. It is entirely fair to call “Black Lives Matter” an anti-white hate movement, because these protests so often erupt in violence and, by undermining public support for effective law enforcement, “Black Lives Matters” jeopardizes the lives of police officers and innocent civilians. (If you haven’t yet read Heather Mac Donald’s The War on Cops: How the New Attack on Law and Order Makes Everyone Less Safe, do so immediately.) Criticizing a genuinely dangerous racial hate movement, however, isn’t the same as saying that black people can’t express dislike for white people. Heck, there are lots of white people I don’t like and, as I said, America is a free country. You can like who you like and hate who you hate, and I will defend your right to your own opinion, even while I call you an idiot for disagreeing with me.

Just because you don’t like Jews doesn’t mean you should be on a list of dangerous extremists, but what I must warn against — and this is where the real danger exists — is conspiratorial anti-Semitism, i.e., the belief that Jews are engaged in nefarious subversive plot. At least since the infamous forgery “Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion” surfaced in czarist Russia, the idea that Jews are all part of an infernal conspiracy has incited violence against Jews. Like every other clever conspiracy theory, paranoid Jew-hating is a toxic mixture of facts, lies and invalid logic, yet people continue falling prey to it. Part of the problem, of course, is that some of what is involved in these conspiracy theories is actually true.

It is true, for example, that many left-wing intellectuals are secularized Jews, and that this has been true from Karl Marx to Leon Trotsky to Wilhelm Reich and so forth on down to the present day. In my own study of radical feminism, for example, I could rattle off many dozens of names — from Shulamith Firestone and Andrea Dworkin to Jaclyn Friedman and Judith “Jack” Halberstam — of influential Jewish feminists. Would it therefore be fair to say feminism is a Jewish plot? No, because there were and are plenty of Gentile feminists (including lapsed Catholics and renegade Protestants) and also because Jews have also been prominent among the critics and opponents of feminism. Jewish authors like Midge Decter (The New Chastity and Other Arguments Against Women’s Liberation) and Steven Goldberg (The Inevitability of Patriarchy) attacked feminism early and effectively, and to this day, some of the most outspoken critics of feminism are conservative Jews.

To say that Jews have been prominently associated with feminism is certainly true, and it is not anti-Semitic to say so. In this regard, I’m reminded of my late friend Andrew Breitbart who, when encountering the claim that Jews run Hollywood, answered, “Yeah. So what?” This is simply a fact, and therefore not controversial, but turning it into a paranoid conspiracy theory is where we encounter the real danger.

All of this is merely a preamble to discussing something I saw today at the so-called “manosphere” site, Return of Kings, “4 Ways National Geographic Is Furthering A Degenerate Leftist Narrative.” This article references the latest issue of National Geographic, which is devoted to promoting the transgender agenda, and I began reading it but came to a screeching halt when I reached the fourth paragraph:

With the nomination of Gary Knell (former CEO of Sesame Workshop) as the CEO of the National Geographic Society and of Susan Goldberg as editor in chief of National Geographic magazine, the now 100% Jewish-controlled National Geographic network is ready to promote usual globalist narratives, like in their recent edition entitled “the New Europeans,” openly defecating on millennia of European cultural heritage, in a giant “F–k you dad!” move, that would have made Angela Merkel proud.


Nice of you to drop by from Stormfront, buddy, but would you mind leaving your Völkischer Beobachter diatribes out of this? While I suppose one could theorize a connection between (a) National Geographic‘s advocacy of transgenderism, and (b) the Jewish ancestry of its executives, I’m pretty sure (c) this non sequitur is unnecessary to your argument, and (d) would tend to alienate many potential allies who share your opposition to radical postmodern Third Wave “queer feminism.”

More to the point, however, I’ve got a hunch you’re barking up the wrong tree. “The personal is political,” as feminists say, and so when you find people engaged in promoting sexual degeneracy — which is what National Geographic is doing — you have every reason to suspect that those involved in this effort are perverts of one sort or another.

Susan Goldberg (left) and Gary Knell (right).

This is not to suggest that Gary Knell or Susan Goldberg are into BDSM or peodphilia or bestiality, but rather to say that I don’t think the editorial staff of National Geographic would welcome investigative scrutiny of their private lives. Did I ever mention my work in exposing the pedophile activist Lawrence Stanley? Because I’ve got a pretty solid track record of smart hunches in this regard, I’m going ask readers to remember my suspicion about the problem at National Geographic. We’re talking about a huge iceberg. Sometimes it can take years to uncover the truth about these weirdos, but they usually slip up sooner or later.

Anyway, my point is that throwing in an anti-Semitic jab while making an argument about something like transgenderism is self-defeating, not only because it is needlessly offensive, but more importantly because it leads you into a cul-de-sac of failure and irrelevance. There’s a reason why people avoid Jew-haters, you know: Genesis 12:3. Selah.

This degenerate crap? It’s a shanda fur die goyim, and I expect that conservative Jews will help lead the fight against it.