The Other McCain

"One should either write ruthlessly what one believes to be the truth, or else shut up." — Arthur Koestler

Queer Feminist Update

Posted on | July 11, 2018 | No Comments

 

Some readers may remember Ellie (a/k/a “Gabi,” whose real name is Gabrielle), the Tampa art student whose anti-heterosexual Tumblr rant was featured here in February (“Your Homophobia Is a ‘Direct Threat’ of ‘Potential Violence,’ Says Queer Feminist”). At the time, Ellie identified as “queer” and “nonbinary” and used “they/them” pronouns. When posting selfies on her Tumblr blog, she called herself “a sexy pink genderless fat orb.” Ellie is “severely mentally ill,” and claims to have “been professionally diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, bipolar type II, and PTSD.” She is into comics, “body positivity, mental health awareness . . . astrology” and, of course, “intersectional feminism.”

 

 

This is 21st-century feminism — an anti-heterosexual radical ideology in which hating men is the sine qua non of “liberation” and “female agency.”

And guess what else is counted as “female agency”? Transgenderism!

 

“I’m a trans guy. . . . I’m looking to get top surgery. I’m looking to get on testosterone. I’m looking to change my wardrobe, change how I am perceived in the world.”

 

Yes, “top surgery” (i.e., radical mastectomy) and synthetic hormone injections are what the 22-year-old queer feminist has decided are necessary for her “liberation” and, uh, “body positivity.” She (or “he”) has started a tag on her/“his” Tumblr blog to discuss her transition into “him,” and is considering calling herself/“himself” “Gabriel.”

Is it necessary for me to explain to parents that if your teenage daughter starts calling herself a feminist, you should consider this symptomatic of mental illness? Especially if she has a Tumblr account? And she dyes her hair pink, gets her nose pierced and wears a dog collar?

Perhaps not every young feminist has pink hair and three different psychiatric diagnoses, but on Tumblr? Yeah, that’s what feminism is. You should keep your daughter far away from it, or one day your daughter will declare she’s “nonbinary,” and then maybe she’ll be transgender, and on and on until she’s nothing but a sad joke of toxic craziness.

* * * * *

Permit me now to get serious, which I don’t enjoy doing, since caustic sarcasm is my preferred mode of expression when dealing with tragedy.

In case Gabrielle or someone who actually knows her and cares about her is reading this, she needs help. Her problem is spiritual.

Notice where she said she was into astrology? That’s a huge red flag. Astrology is an evil influence. Combine that with her gender/sexuality issues and her suicidal ideation, and you can make a case that Gabrielle is a victim of diabolical obsession. An Exorcist Explains the Demonic, by Father Gabriele Amorth, offers this explanation:

Diabolical obsessions are disturbances or extremely strong hallucinations that the demon imposes, often invincibly, on the mind of the victim. In these cases, the person is no longer a master of his own thoughts. . . . The objects of these hallucinations can be manifested as visions, as voices . . . as monstrous figures, horrifying animals, or devils. In other cases it can be an impulse to commit suicide or to do evil to others and, particularly in the young, it can lead to confusion about one’s gender.

If you examine Gabrielle’s art, you’ll find it is disturbing in nature. Sometimes it’s “cute,” but in a weird and childish way. Furthermore, Gabrielle’s “friends” — both in real life and online — are evil influences, encouraging her self-destructive attitudes. This is a pattern of behavior, which I have seen before. A person who feels in some way damaged and unlovable, is attracted to a subculture full of freaks and weirdos, where she can be seen as relatively more attractive by comparison.

Gabrielle’s history of eating disorders and self-harm, her feelings of loneliness — a misfit, an outcast — make her particularly vulnerable to demonic influence. You can laugh at this possibility, if you wish, but I’m telling you in all seriousness, demonic influences are real.

As I say, I’ve seen this pattern before. Not to get too specific, but I once knew a young lesbian who, as it turned out, wasn’t actually a lesbian. She’d gotten a bad reputation in high school because of her promiscuity. When she got to college, she somehow fell in with a crew of lesbians. She had a girlfriend who followed her around like a looming shadow. You couldn’t even talk to her if her girlfriend was around, but she didn’t seem to notice (or else didn’t mind) how this dark presence affected her life. Because I don’t want to get too specific (for fear of compromising her identity), I won’t relate the circumstances by which she eventually made her escape, but trust me when I say that the pattern of Gabrielle’s life strikes me as very familiar. Over the years, I’ve seen all kinds of people go down similar paths of self-destruction, because they started hanging around losers who dragged them down. Beware — evil is real.



 

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