The Other McCain

"One should either write ruthlessly what one believes to be the truth, or else shut up." — Arthur Koestler

Why Wasn’t Ibraheem Yazeed in Jail?

Posted on | November 9, 2019 | No Comments

Aniah Blanchard (front center) with her family.

“The warrant affidavit for [Ibraheem] Yazeed says blood discovered in the passenger’s side of [Aniah Blanchard’s] car was indicative of someone suffering a life threatening injury.”

Unfortunately, it seems unlikely that this beautiful 19-year-old girl will be found alive, and the suspect will likely face murder charges:

The abduction of Alabama college student Aniah Blanchard outside an Auburn convenience store was witnessed, according to new court records made public Friday.
Charging documents against 29-year-old Ibraheem Yazeed said he was witnessed “forcing Blanchard into a vehicle against her will and then leaving with her in the vehicle. Blanchard has not been located at this time.”
Yazeed, formally charged Thursday with first-degree kidnapping, was taken into custody late Thursday night by U.S. Marshals in Pensacola. It was through that arrest that the affidavit in the kidnapping case became available. . . .
According to the affidavit by Auburn police Det. Josh Mixon, Blanchard was last seen by a family member the evening of Oct. 23 at a residence in the 1000 block of Alan Avenue in Auburn. The Southern Union College student from Homewood was officially reported missing Thursday, Oct. 24. She last communicated with a friend late on the night of Oct. 23. Police said her vehicle was seen in the early-morning hours of Oct. 24 along South College Street.
Police recovered the teen’s black 2017 Honda CRV from an apartment complex on the 6100 block of Boardwalk Boulevard in Montgomery around 6:15 p.m. the following evening, which was Friday. A citizen reported the vehicle to police.
Auburn police Capt. Lorenza Dorsey said Blanchard’s vehicle had been damaged sometime between the last time it was seen in Auburn and Friday night. The charging document obtained Friday said that blood evidence was discovered in the passenger’s compartment of the vehicle and was “indicative of someone suffering a life-threatening injury.”
The evidence was submitted to the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences and confirmed to be that of Blanchard. Video evidence from the convenience store at 1599 South College Street placed both Blanchard and Yazeed at the store during the same time. “This was the last time she was seen,” Mixon wrote. A witness later identified Yazeed as the individual he saw forcing Blanchard into a vehicle against her will. . . .
Yazeed was already awaiting trial in an unrelated kidnapping, robbery and attempted murder in Montgomery that left a 77-year-old man “near death.”
Auburn Police Chief Paul Register said there’s a strong possibility at least one other person was involved in Blanchard’s disappearance and more arrests are expected.

As I mentioned in an update last night (“Police Arrest Ibraheem Yazeed, 29, in Disappearance of Aniah Blanchard, 19”), the suspect has a lengthy criminal record — apparently his entire adult life has been devoted to perpetrating crime — and yet, for some reason, Yazeed managed to get bonded out after being arrested for a savage crime that nearly killed an old man. What is happening in Alabama’s criminal justice system that would result in such a dangerous person being turned loose on the streets? I don’t know, but I suspect it might have something to do with The Bail Project, a Soros-funded operation I wrote about in April: “‘No One Could Have Predicted This Tragedy’ (But It Was Predictable).”

If what I suspect is true, here we have a young woman of color being victimized by a serial offender because turning violent criminals loose is what a bunch of idiot liberals consider “social justice.” People should be angry, and there needs to be some serious reporting on this. More violence against women that feminists won’t notice, for some reason.


 

Comments