The Other McCain

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Wicked Witches: Marion Zimmer Bradley and the Feminist Pagan Sex Cult

Posted on | July 4, 2016 | 77 Comments

Marion Zimmer Bradley was famous for her Avalon novel series.

“Wicca refers to the practice of European paganism popular throughout Europe and North America. . . . Dianic Wicca refers to a more radical women-only practice, named for the Goddess Diana. The novels of Marion Zimmer Bradley have been influential for Dianic Wiccans . . .”
Meredith Miller, “Dianic Wicca,” in Historical Dictionary of Lesbian Literature (2006)

“The first time she molested me, I was three. The last time, I was twelve, and able to walk away. . . . She was cruel and violent, as well as completely out of her mind sexually. I am not her only victim, nor were her only victims girls.”
Moira Greyland, Marion Zimmer Bradley’s daughter

When the revelations about Marion Zimmer Bradley rocked the world of science fiction two years ago, I pointed out that the evidence of Bradley’s bizarre perversion had been hidden in plain sight. Not only was she married to a bisexual pedophile, Walter Breen, who was rather notorious for his interest in young boys, but Bradley wrote lesbian pulp fiction under pseudonyms, including I Am a Lesbian (as Lee Chapman, 1962) and The Strange Women (as Miriam Gardner, 1967). Furthermore, Bradley quite pointedly rejected Judeo-Christian morality:

Bradley . . . professed a lifelong interest in the occult and in the early 1980s described herself as “neopagan,” explaining her faith as one that “rejects the Christian belief in man’s dominion over the earth.”
She said she also believed in clairvoyance, extrasensory perception and reincarnation . . .

As I explained two years ago:

Most people have no idea how influential Bradley was in 20th-century neo-paganism. Categorizing her pagan feminist genre as “lifestyle fantasy” novels, historian Brian Stableford has recounted how Bradley “became something of a guru to numerous writers of a similar stripe, several of whom — including Diana L. Paxson and Gael Baudino — described themselves as priestesses of ‘Dianic Wicca.’” Bradley and Paxson were co-founders of the California-based Center for Non-Traditional Religion, subsequently renamed the Fellowship of the Spiral Path, which is focused on the “Triple Goddess” (Maiden, Mother, Crone) of neo-pagan belief.
Dianic Wicca is quite nearly a synonym for “lesbian paganism” or “feminist witchcraft.” It was founded by a crazy Hungarian-born woman known as Zsuzsanna Budapest who became a feminist, divorced her husband, abandoned her two sons and turned lesbian.

Marian Zimmer Bradley was a monster whose occult beliefs and deviant sexuality were widely viewed as “progressive” among leftist bohemian avant-garde intellectuals. The Commie Dopehead Sex Maniacs of the 1960s did not suddenly appear out of nowhere. The philosophy of the Sexual Revolution had been developed in preceding decades by Wilhelm Reich, Alfred Kinsey and Hugh Hefner, among others.

Feminism’s distinctive contribution to this perverse ideology was somewhat belated and widely misunderstood. However, if you read Karla Jay’s Tales of the Lavender Menace (pp. 195-207) you will find that this lesbian feminist (who subsequently became director of Women’s and Gender Studies at Pace University) spent some time in the 1970s hanging out with Jeff Poland. He was co-founder of the Sexual Freedom League and the Psychedelic Venus Church (PVC) and Karla Jay’s book describes orgies that went on at the PVC. Not coincidentally, Jeff Poland was a pedophile who spent five years as a fugitive in Australia after he was charged with sexually molesting an 8-year-old girl. According to radical feminist Nikki Craft, Poland committed his crime while baby-sitting for a couple at a “swinger” party hosted by a nudist group. It is interesting to note, in Craft’s article, that Jeff Poland was friendly with Lee Baxandall, founder of The Naturist Society. Baxandall’s wife, Ros Baxandall, was an early leader of radical feminism, a member of both the Redstockings and W.I.T.C.H. (Women’s International Terrorist Conspiracy from Hell).

Nudists, feminists, “swingers,” pedophiles, lesbians, witches — every kind of madness was unleashed from Pandora’s Box in the 1960s, and justified as a rejection of Christianity and sexual “repression.”

Katy Faust was raised by a lesbian couple after her mother divorced her father. She became a Christian activist (her husband is a pastor) and her blog Ask the Bigot features well-informed criticism of the LGBT agenda. Last July, she published a lengthy account by Marion Zimmer Bradley’s daughter Moira Greyland, which included this concise summary of her parents’ pagan sexual cult beliefs:

My observation of my father and mother’s actual belief is this: since everyone is naturally gay, it is the straight establishment that makes everyone hung up and therefore limited. Sex early will make people willing to have sex with everyone, which will bring about the utopia while eliminating homophobia and helping people become “who they really are.” It will also destroy the hated nuclear family with its paternalism, sexism, ageism (yes, for pedophiles, that is a thing) and all other “isms.” If enough children are sexualized young enough, gayness will suddenly be “normal” and accepted by everyone, and the old fashioned notions about fidelity will vanish. As sex is integrated as a natural part of every single relationship, the barriers between people will vanish, and the utopia will appear, as “straight culture” goes the way of the dinosaur. As my mother used to say: “Children are brainwashed into believing they don’t want sex.”

Many of these beliefs, especially hatred of “old fashioned notions” about marriage and family, are now considered mainstream in feminism. When will people wake up to the danger of this satanic wickedness?

“Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live.”
Exodus 22:18 (KJV)

Jehovah was quite clear about this and, while I certainly do not advocate a return to Salem circa 1692, it seems to me foolish to ignore the possibility that supernatural evil really exists. You might believe in witches, too, if you spend enough time staring into The Feminist Abyss.

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The Sex Trouble project has been supported by contributions from readers. The first edition of Sex Trouble: Radical Feminism and the War on Human Nature is available from Amazon.com, $11.96 in paperback or $1.99 in Kindle ebook format.





 

 


Comments

  • Jeanette Victoria ?????????

    I was political conservative…a rare breed among the neo-pagans

  • Jeanette Victoria ?????????

    Not that I recall but I will guess the intersect was though SciFi fandom and the Society for Creative Anachronism

  • Joe Joe

    What took you away from paganism?

  • Jeanette Victoria ?????????

    I would say Lawrence Auster influenced me greatly plus my own study of early Celtic Christianity.

  • mole

    Had my best mates cousin joined a new age cult which was one charismatic gentleman and his harem of about 15 ladies living in a yurt in the middle of a paddock.
    She signed over hundreds of thousands of dollars asets to him as well.
    That bloke doesnt know how close he came to having a serious accident and his body never being found. Vile creature.

  • DeadMessenger

    Aren’t a good many of them not interested in a religious or spiritual experience, but rather seeking…don’t have words…more of a sex cult? I personally know some professed witches for whom that seems to be the case.

  • DeadMessenger

    Interesting. In my ministry work, I hear about a lot of various types of demonic activity. (They seem very busy these days.) I’ve had one personal experience as an observer, but have been given photographic and audio evidence by people I trust, who wanted my impressions.

  • DeadMessenger

    Ok, you probably heard this before, but it bears repeating. In fact, I’ll change the identities to add to the fun.

    Bill Clinton is sitting in a church listening to a sermon, when suddenly, the devil appears in a huge cloud of smoke and sulfur. The congregation flees in a panic, except Bill, who is sitting calmly in a pew examining his fingernails.

    Satan notices Bill sitting there and asks him, “Why didn’t you run away like everyone else?”

    Bill replies, “I’m not afraid of you. I’ve been married to your sister for 40 years.”

  • http://www.paganvigil.com NeoWayland

    It would be more trouble than it’s worth. Assuming you could even get it organized. There’s a saying about herding cats that applies here.

  • DeadMessenger

    Catechism of the Catholic Church, scroll down to paragraph 841, and notice where they clearly state that Catholics and Muslims worship the same god. There’s one problem, right there.

    http://www.vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/archive/catechism/p123a9p3.htm

  • DeadMessenger

    Here’s the same link I just posted for QM, above (in case you’re only checking Disqus). This is the Catechism of the Catholic Church on the Vatican website. Scroll down to paragraph 841 to see where Catholic doctrine states that Catholics worship the same god as Muslims.

    http://www.vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/archive/catechism/p123a9p3.htm

    So one thing believing Catholics could do is read their own catechism in its entirety rather than just the pamphlet they give you when you’re 6. Then they may come to see that their church is not what they thought it was, nor what it ought to be. Then they can find a Bible believing church and go there instead.

    In my town, priests attend services at the church I go to, sayng they need “spiritual food.” Yet, they remain Catholics.

  • DeadMessenger

    [snort]

  • http://www.paganvigil.com NeoWayland

    Yeah, about that.

    Technically some pagan trads draw in part from fertility cults. So some misguided people see joining a pagan group as a way to get their rocks off. They could meet Hot Bisexual Pagan Chicks and have mind-blowing Ritual Sex under the Full Moon!

    It doesn’t work like that.

    Those are the ones who soon “wash out” or spin off to form their own sex-based group. When they can’t attract members to the new group, they blame everyone but themselves. After all, they’re open about sex. Why wouldn’t people line up to have sex with them?

  • DeadMessenger

    Wouldn’t you say that Wicca sort of stems from the Pythoness oracle cults of temple prostitutes found in Greek temples (mostly dedicated to Apollo)? Many of the rituals seem very similar, from my reading.

  • DeadMessenger

    Hopefully that last question was rhetorical.

  • http://www.paganvigil.com NeoWayland

    You have no idea.

    ?They want flashy cheap answers to their problems. In easy to swallow pill form if possible.

    They want to believe they are victims to mysterious forces that are out to get them.

    They don’t want to take responsibility. They want to be saved.

    I’m tempted sometimes. With a few less scruples I could make tons of cash from some very gullible people. There’s a part of me that still longs for the thrill of exploiting people and knowing that mostly they are too lazy and foolish to fight back.?
    Do you know what I get asked about the most?

  • Jeanette Victoria ?????????

    Today’s wicca was invented out of thin air by Gerald Gardner, he was a Freemason and a member of Aleister Crowley’s Ordo Templi Orientis(as was Scientology founder L. R. Hubbard).

    In fact Gardner rituals that he “discovered” were stolen from Crowley. Kipling’s ‘Oak and Ash and Thorn’ was incorporated into Gardnerian Wicca

  • http://www.paganvigil.com NeoWayland

    Not exactly.

    The origins of Wicca are snarled, Gerald Gardner liked being the mysterious wise man.

    There are four distinct threads. One was the folk tradition that Gardner was initiated into. This tradition was incomplete and placed the emphasis on practical magick rather than Deity and worship. There was the stuff that Gardner researched from pagan sources, which focuses more on Deities and worship. There was the stuff that Gardener “borrowed” from Freemasonry, the O.T.O. and the Golden Dawn. Finally there was the original stuff which tried to make everything cohesive. This last bit probably mostly came from Doreen Valiente. Gardner didn’t give her credit for years, that almost certainly led to their falling out.

  • Joe Joe

    I wonder when that was added.

    And yes, many Catholics went through Catholic school and thought they learned the faith, but apparently they didn’t.

    It’s hard when you come from Catholicism to look elsewhere, which may explain why your friends stay put. I am a big fan of the Latin Mass. (The stuff in English is horrific now.) But the places that do Latin Mass are limited. There are also schismatics, like the SPPX, but they were chased out of a church here in San Diego.

    A bible believing church would be what now? Most of the mainline Protestant denominations have long been co-opted by the “Church of NIce” and global governance.

  • Jeanette Victoria ?????????

    1951 Gardner invented Wicca their “rituals” were plagiarized from Crowley and Kipling

  • Quartermaster

    It is getting harder to find a true bible believing, teaching and preaching church. Most of them will be independent churches. Frankly, after studying the doctrines, both official and unofficial, I have to stay away from the Roman catholic Church.

  • Quartermaster

    Frankly, you will have to “come out of her.” I know bible believing churches are hard to find, but it is worth it to look. Frankly, the RCC left those ranks with the completion of the Council of Trent.

  • Quartermaster

    Independent churches are seeing more and more people coming from the RCC and mainline protestant denominations. As they go further and further form the truth, people that know things aren’t right leave and look elsewhere. Eventually, those priests will find they have to leave entirely. The noose is tightening in all such churches.

    The real schismatics are the people that are making it impossible for Christians to stay. When he broke with Zinzindorf Wesley said “The weight of schism does not fall on the one that leaves, It falls on the one who made it impossible to stay.” When people see things aren’t right, they need to keep Wesley’s statement in mind and leave.

  • Quartermaster

    I have the Catechism in both bound book and electronic forms.

  • DeadMessenger

    We can certainly agree on that. =)

  • DeadMessenger

    I would guess Vatican II, but am not sure (as to your first question). I know that many conservative Catholics about lost their minds over that.

    As for “bible believing,” a rule of thumb for me personally is how many times during the sermon the pastor says “Open your bibles to…” The more, the better. Nothing like good expository preaching. I also look for pastors that spend a lot of time talking about sin, and also eschatology.

    I attend a denomination of a very large group of non-denominational churches. (You might be able to guess which one from that description). This particular non-denominational group tends to be charismatic, and sometimes, wack-a-doodle charismatic. My particular church is not. It’s not Reformed, more’s the pity, but is pretty staight-laced evangelical. My personal beliefs are very Reformational, so I think the elders get exasperated with me frequently when I question them about doctrine. =) In fact, the same questioning pain in the tookus that I am here, I also am privately in church. And they don’t kick me out, so there’s that.

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