The Other McCain

"One should either write ruthlessly what one believes to be the truth, or else shut up." — Arthur Koestler

K-12 Implosion Update

Posted on | April 11, 2018 | 1 Comment

Good teachers are leaving the public education system:

A teacher has slammed her ‘disruptive’ students and their ‘rude’ parents over their lack of respect for her ‘poorly paid’ profession in a Facebook rant that’s gone viral.
Julie Marburger, 45, a mother-of-eight who works at Cedar Creek Intermediate School in Texas, said she had been pushed to quit her role as she feels as though she has ‘no way to do the job I was hired to do… teach kids.’
Along with her status, which has had 322,000 likes and more than 400,000 shares, she posted images of her messy classroom, showing broken shelves, books and even an iPad, explaining that many of the items destroyed by the children were paid for out of her own pocket as she has no budget.
Julie, who is originally from Utah and teaches students aged between 11 and 12, revealed she had been pushed to the brink of quitting that day by a ‘disrespectful’ parent who shouted at her in her classroom for holding her son to account.
In the post, she wrote: ‘I left work early today after an incident with a parent left me unable emotionally to continue for the day.
‘I have already made the decision to leave teaching at the end of this year, and today, I don’t know if I will make it even that long.
‘Parents have become far too disrespectful, and their children are even worse.
‘Administration always seems to err on the side of keeping the parent happy, which leaves me with no way to do the job I was hired to do… teach kids.’
Julie, who has four daughters, and four stepchildren, then shared a stream of classroom pictures taken over the past few days of her messy classroom, including broken shelves, broken books and even an iPad discarded on the floor.
‘I have finally had enough of the disregard for personal and school property and am drawing a line in the sand on a myriad of behaviors that I am through tolerating,’ she added.

To borrow a feminist slogan: “Blame the system, not the victims.” My aunt Barbara Ellis was a science teacher at LaGrange (Ga.) High School, recognized and awarded for her excellence, but toward the end of her career, she became profoundly disillusioned with the system. There were pressures to “dumb down” the curriculum and lower standards. This was even before the nightmare of the Bush administration’s misguided “No Child Left Behind” policies, but it was already apparent during the 1990s that discipline was becoming impossible because the system undermined teachers’ classroom authority. When we see how “red flags” were ignored in the case of Parkland shooter Nikolas Cruz because of Obama-era policies and Broward County’s PROMISE (Preventing Recidivism through Opportunities, Mentoring, Interventions, Support & Education) program, we recognize that the decline of discipline has become a crisis.

Somebody ought to write a book. Oh, wait . . .

 

 

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