The Other McCain

"One should either write ruthlessly what one believes to be the truth, or else shut up." — Arthur Koestler

Death by ‘Blue Pill’

Posted on | August 14, 2019 | No Comments

 

In January, I wrote about the case of Grant Amato (“Florida Man Kills Family After Stealing Money to Contact a Bulgarian Whore”), sarcastically making what seemed to me a rather obvious point:

 If you were going to steal $200,000 for a whore, why wouldn’t you find a local whore, instead of some whore in Bulgaria you met via the Internet? Like, I don’t know the going rate for whores in Seminole County, Florida, but I’m pretty sure $200,000 would buy a lot of time with whores.

Amato killed his parents and younger brother because he believed he was in a “relationship” with this Bulgarian camgirl, and his family — understandably angry that he had stole money from them to pay for Internet sessions with her — had insisted that he seek treatment for his “sex addiction.” Instead, he left the psychiatric treatment center early and murdered his family in cold blood:

He first shot his mother as she sat at her computer desk. He then waited for his father to return home from work to shoot him too. Finally, several hours later, he shot dead his brother, who had come by the house to visit.

Amato was sentenced to life in prison Monday, which prompted an opaque comment by Rational Male author Rollo Tomassi:

Now, you may not catch Rollo’s meaning, even if you know that “red pill” is a phrase “borrowed from the 1999 film The Matrix [which] refers to seeing through socially accepted illusions to understand the brutal truths of human nature.” By contrast, when Rollo refers to “blue pill” thinking, he means among other things the unrealistic idealization of women which makes someone like Grant Amato think he’s in a “relationship” with a whore whose performances he has viewed via webcam.

More generally, however, if “blue pill” thinking leads to sexual failure — and by definition, any man paying money to a camgirl is failing — then the consequences can be dangerous, as Rollo says.

The common feminist complaint that the “red pill” community is about misogyny (hatred of women) rests upon the implicit premise that sexual behavior is a zero-sum game in which male success is inherently oppressive to women. Feminists believe that women should possess a sort of totalitarian monopoly on sexual power, and generally seek to exercise this power by enforcing rules that make heterosexual relationships an ordeal in which men, like lab rats in a Skinner box, are required to respond exactly as women wish, or risk disastrous punishment.

Men who attempt to cooperate with these rules — “blue pill” men — are playing a losing game, because such cooperation ultimately renders them uninteresting to women, who become bored with their easy conquest of the kind of man who is willing to be a woman’s household pet.

What the “blue pill” approach produces is men who are so completely oriented toward doing whatever women want that he ceases to have any independent identity. He becomes something like Andrew Golis, an obscure nonentity known only as “Jessica Valenti’s husband” (and her recent memoir expressed how thoroughly she despises him). Oh, and speaking of the she-devil:

I’ve written before about the lack of resources for young men during critical times in their lives. What feminism does for women — providing girls with alternative media, cultural norms, and a language to understand sexism — is what we need for boys and young men.

 

Jessica Valenti’s status as an authority on “what we need for boys and young men” is rather suspect, given that she only ever writes about males for the purpose of further demonizing and humiliating them. It would be impossible to exaggerate her hatred of men. Ilhan Omar doesn’t hate Jews as much as Jessica Valenti hates men. If her husband committed suicide tomorrow, it would be the happiest day of Jessica Valenti’s life.

There actually are “resources for young men,” namely the three Rational Male books by Rollo Tomassi. Has he written some things that I might quibble with? Is he too bluntly cynical about women? Perhaps, but many readers have attested that The Rational Male is a life-saving book, one that provides men a positive approach to masculinity, especially in terms of helping them understand problems of relationships with women. I don’t know if there was much hope for Grant Amato — some losers are just too far gone down the road to destruction — but men who have read Rollo’s books say that he has helped them analyze their problems and find construction solutions. Pretty doggone sure he’s against spending $200,000 on a Bulgarian camgirl, anyway.



 

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