The Other McCain

"One should either write ruthlessly what one believes to be the truth, or else shut up." — Arthur Koestler

Mandatory ‘Struggle Sessions’ in Arizona

Posted on | September 16, 2020 | No Comments

 

Robert Shibley, executive director of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), calls attention to how “critical race theory” indoctrination is made mandatory at universities:

Teaching about anti-racism in a state university Intro to Communications class is one thing. Telling students they have to do “inner work” on their beliefs as college classwork sounds a lot more like thought reform than education. Maybe this isn’t what it looks like, but if you can’t make a grammar school kid say the Pledge of Allegiance during World War II, there’s no way a professor can mandate psychological therapy for his or her adult students.

In other words, making this kind of indoctrination mandatory — and Introduction to Communications is a required class for all freshmen at Arizona State University — violates the constitutional rights of students.

Ask yourself what educational purpose is intended by requiring students to make a commitment to “doing the inner work of anti-racism”? We might suppose that Arizona State would never have admitted these students if their scholastic achievement was deficient. So it may be assumed that these are reasonably intelligent young people who have completed a state-approved high school curriculum. Unless Arizona schools are demonstrably failing in terms of teaching “anti-racism,” how does requiring this assignment in a freshman communications class constitute an academic necessity? What need is there for this?

Without any evidence of a general need for this “inner work,” then, we may assume that this indoctrination is intended to serve the political agenda of ASU’s faculty and administration. What is that agenda?

Cultural revolution:

A struggle session was a form of public humiliation and torture that was used by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) at various times in the Mao era, particularly years immediately before and after the establishment of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and during the Cultural Revolution. The aim of a struggle session was to shape public opinion and humiliate, persecute, or execute political rivals and those deemed class enemies.
In general, the victim of a struggle session was forced to admit various crimes before a crowd of people who would verbally and physically abuse the victim until he or she confessed. Struggle sessions were often held at the workplace of the accused, but they were sometimes conducted in sports stadiums where large crowds would gather if the target was well-known.

The purpose of mandatory “anti-racism” training is to humiliate white people, to destroy their self-esteem by requiring them to confess their guilt of “racism” and denounce themselves as oppressors.

There is another obvious purpose in making these “struggle sessions” mandatory for all freshman. It allows the faculty to identify any potential dissenter in the student body. Any freshman who complains about these “anti-racism” lessons will become a target for destruction. Outspoken conservatives on campus are systematically downgraded by their professors and denied opportunities for grants, internships, etc. All campus benefits are exclusively reserved for those students favored by the liberal faculty and administration; conservative students are subjected to harassment, and excluded from graduate programs.

Confronted with a program of political coercion, most students will voluntarily comply — they are sheep, and will do as they are told. The only hope for conservative students to make it through university is to keep their mouths shut and stay under the radar, to avoid any overt expression of their political beliefs so as not to get “profiled.”




 

Comments