The Other McCain

"One should either write ruthlessly what one believes to be the truth, or else shut up." — Arthur Koestler

Media’s Anti-White Bias Makes Houston Drive-By Shooting National News

Posted on | January 7, 2019 | 1 Comment

 

When 7-year-old Jazmine Barnes was killed in a drive-by shooting in Houston Dec. 30, the story “captured nationwide attention,” because Jazmine’s family claimed that the shooter was a white man:

The teen and her mother described the suspect as a white man with blue eyes, a thin build and no beard. They say he “looked sick” with sunken cheekbones and a pale face with a “five o’clock shadow.” He was wearing a black hoodie.

CNN jumped on the story — RAAAAACISM! — and the usual crew of #BlackLivesMatter hate-hustlers leaped into action, raising money and sending out incendiary tweets. Unfortunately for the purveyors of this narrative, it was false. The white man in the red truck that Jazmine’s family had seen wasn’t the shooter, but an innocent guy who was himself caught in the line of fire. The actual perpetrators were driving a KIA.

Murder suspects Larry Woodruffe (left) and Eric Black Jr. (right).

Larry Woodruffe, 24, was the shooter, and was riding with Eric Black Jr., 20, according to the police, when Woodruffe spotted the vehicle that Jazmine’s mother was driving and, apparently, mistook it for the vehicle of one of their drug-gang rivals. Woodruffe opened fire with a 9mm pistol and he and Black didn’t realize they had targeted an innocent family until they saw news reports the next day. So the “white killer” angle that made this story a subject of “nationwide attention” was false, and now the media that exploited the death of Jazmine Barnes to gin up a firestorm of racial fear will now drop the story entirely.

Houston ranks 22nd on the list of most dangerous cities in America, with 269 homicides in 2017. The top five most dangerous cities:

1. St. Louis
2. Detroit
3. Baltimore
4. Memphis
5. Kansas City

In 2017, those cities reported a combined total of 1,145 homicides. How many of those crimes “captured national attention”? You see the national media do not randomly pick murders as newsworthy. They believed the shooting of Jazmine Barnes might be evidence of a surge of right-wing white supremacist hate crime that they could blame on President Trump and, now that this angle has proven false . . . never mind.

(Hat-tips: Kirby McCain on Twitter and Ed Driscoll at Instapundit.)



 

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